Bridging the Gap with Oliver

 

Give us a quick overview of what to expect from reading your book!

 

Bridging the Gap dives into the stories of people from all different walks of life who have found ways to incorporate travel into their lives and encountered incredible results. From stronger GPAs throughout school to higher job satisfaction across a career, travel proves itself a valuable asset in driving meaning and fulfillment during all stages of life.

The book offers strategies, stories, and suggestions for how travel can and should be included in every period of life for any lifestyle. Ultimately, my hope is that reading Bridging the Gap will encourage anyone to seek out travel and gap year experiences and point them in the right direction to make it happen. 

All proceeds are going to COVID relief so we can all get back to traveling soon! 

 

What was the hardest aspect of writing/publishing a book?

 

I think the hardest aspect was finding the confidence to move forward with the final steps of publishing. There are always new ideas popping up in my head for things I would want to add or change in the manuscript. Allowing myself to feel confident in where the book is as a representation of that time and place while I continue to grow forward was a valuable challenge to navigate. 

Did you learn/perfect a new skill from this process? If so, what?

 

Diligence and time management are skills I’ll always be working on but were definitely improved over the process of writing Bridging the Gap. Hopping back into the manuscript as frequently as possible and just moving along day by day helped me hone in on my focus and dedication toward the project. 

 

What inspired you to write and publish an entire book about your gap year?

 

The book is actually not about my own gap year. I wanted to write Bridging the Gap to serve as a useful tool of encouragement for people who want to travel more but aren’t sure how. When I set off on my first gap year with Winterline, there weren’t many resources to support my exploration into the idea and I hope Bridging the Gap can be that for other people. Since Winterline, I’ve been able to travel in a wide range of ways across different periods of time. People always ask me how they can do something similar, so I wanted to write a book that highlights a bunch of ways various people have made room for travel in their respective lifestyles. Bridging the Gap highlights students, young professionals, digital nomads, retirees, and more who have all successfully incorporated travel into their lives. 

 

What did you gain from your gap year? What do you think was the most beneficial aspect of taking a gap year?

 

My gap year experience with Winterline helped me realize that travel and exploration can be staples in my life. I was exposed to so many people who were doing exciting things all across the globe and I realized there was no one concrete path I needed to take moving forward. The degree of confidence and independence I felt leaving Winterline has been hugely beneficial in enabling me to take the reins on my education and career journey. bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

 

What did Winterline do specifically that benefitted you and/or your future? Did your plans for yourself change once completing your gap year?

 

Winterline supported an experience focused on exploration and breadth of perspective. Everyone involved really encouraged expanding your horizons to consider new vantage points toward life. Heading into my gap year, I had deferred admissions to Vanderbilt University in Nashville Tennessee where I later enrolled and have since graduated from. The lessons I learned from Winterline grew and were instrumental parts in supporting my pursuit of travel over the past 5 years. Without Winterline, I doubt I would have found myself doing nearly as much of what brings me meaning and joy now. 

 

What do you think students should consider this Fall if their college plans have changed?

 

I think now is the perfect time to consider a gap year. International travel may not be immediately available, but taking the time to craft a year of experience that brings you meaning outside of a school setting is invaluable. Developing independence and confidence while leaning into a curiosity for your different passions will not only make you a better student when it comes time to head to university, it will invigorate an excitement for learning. 

 

Any other advice for students in this current situation?

 

Start small. A gap year doesn’t need to be a massive leap into the unknown where you leave everything behind and start anew. It can be, but often, it starts with a simple commitment to yourself to try something different. Plan out a week-long trip where you separate yourself from whatever your day-to-day might be. It could be a week camping away from work, a handful of days road tripping to a new part of the country, or flying to a place you’ve always wanted to visit but never made the time. 

The week will give a taste of what it’s like to take adventure into your own hands. Use it as motivation to start planning out what a longer commitment could look like. Every gap year will be different but each should be fueled by curiosity and passion that typically hides dormant inside our busy routines. Brainstorm a list of five things and five places that have always interested you. The list doesn’t need to make sense or add up yet – just get the ideas flowing and on paper. 

Let a friend or family member know that you’re thinking about taking time to pursue something different and share your list with them. Bounce ideas around together and pretty soon your list will start narrowing itself down and you’ll have someone to keep you motivated as you plan things out and commit to your next adventure. bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

Can you give some background on your travel experience, what led you to do choosing a gap year, and ultimately what led you to get the idea to write this book?

Toward the end of high school, I was sitting in my driveway when I received an acceptance email from what I thought was my dream university. I had been constantly working over the years for this moment but I remember feeling somewhat indifferent about the email. I was excited, but I questioned if all the work was truly worth it and what my motivations had been along the way. 

At that moment, I decided I would do something different that no one had encouraged up to that point. That something became my first gap year traveling across ten countries over nine months. Since then, I’ve pursued multiple gap year experiences living and traveling in places around the world. I wrote Bridging the Gap to encourage people to seek out travel and show that you can incorporate travel into any lifestyle at any point in an education or career journey. 

Did you find any correlations between mental health and travelling/gap years?

Definitely. A large amount of research is out there demonstrating how taking time to travel and pursue gap year experiences has positive effects on mental health and well-being. These experiences rejuvenate inspiration and excitement for life which is often sorely needed in the grind of today’s world. 

What are some of the main skills you find you learn or develop during a Gap Year/Travel?

Resiliency, creativity, and empathy. 

Things often don’t go quite according to plan while traveling. You end up in situations without much of the typical comforts you’ve come to rely on be it routines, foods, directions, or cultural norms. 

Creativity comes when you find out different ways around these obstacles. You learn to plan and alter plans independently and are exposed to a variety of ways to go about doing that. Your mind has much more time to wander and explore ideas you otherwise would’ve been too busy to lean into.

After seeing different parts of the world and living in places other than whatever was previously called home, I believe you develop a stronger sense of empathy. It’s much easier to appreciate and value the perspective of others once you’ve walked a bit in their environment. Feeling lost at times makes you much more akin to lend a hand to others whenever they may similarly be in need of some help.bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

Any advice on alternatives for people to “scratch” their travel itch during COVID?

Great question and one I’m still working on myself. I’ve found that camping and spending time outdoors has been helpful. It reminds me how much the environment right around us has to offer and is a great way to explore a bit. 

Reading and watching different travel-based stories also transports my mind for a while. I finish with an even bigger itch than before but it’s nice to get lost in a travel story for a while. 

Last thing I would add is to do some memory logging. I’ve been going back through old travel photos/videos and it’s been awesome to slow down and appreciate all the memories. Right now I’m attempting to catalog them a bit in little picture books or movies and it’s been pretty fun. 

Does a gap year/travel make you more employable? How does one reconcile gaps on a resume where they have travelled? How do they make this travel experience work in their favour?

100 percent. A gap year and travel experience signals an individual’s ability to adapt and adjust to different environments. Soft skills like adaptability, resilience, and creativity are constantly cited as the most needed attributes in the workplace that are simultaneously the most difficult to teach. 

A gap year experience allows people to refresh and refocus their career priorities. It gives time to ensure that you’re setting off toward a path you find value and meaning in. Speaking to this confidence is essential to translating the value of travel into the value you bring to the workplace. 

Pairing a gap year experience with the pursuit of a passion or skill set on the side will deliver an even more marketable skill set. The bulk of my book was written while traveling and it now serves me well in any interview. Not to mention, any travel experience is probably the best icebreaker and conversation point for an interviewer who has seen the same resume 100 times that day. 

What’s next for you? Where to next?

All this time in quarantine has left me with a pretty extensive travel list by now. I’m thinking a trip across the Trans-Siberian Railroad could be a cool way to cover some ground once we’re allowed out of the house again. 

bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

You can buy Bridging the Gap on Amazon, with all proceeds going to COVID19 relief.

Meet the Field Advisors: Hillevi Johnson

We’re so happy to welcome Hillevi back as a Field Advisor! You can read her original spotlight here, and read on to learn even more about Hillevi.

What made you decide to return as a Field Advisor?

Falling in love with so many different aspects of the Winterline experience made it very easy to return. I watched my previous students transform before my eyes as they leapt outside of their comfort zones, fostered deep connections with each other, and really evaluated who they are now and who they want to be in the future. To have had any kind of hand in that process felt really special to me, and I didn’t have to think twice about committing to another wonderful group.

Where are you most excited about returning to this year?

I previously worked with Trimester 1, so I am SO excited to be with students as they move through Trimesters 2 and 3. Since the African countries are a recent option within the Winterline gap year itinerary, I’m most excited to see how students respond to what they’ll see, learn, and experience in Rwanda and South Africa. winterline, field advisor, Hillevi Johnson

What’s your favorite part about working with the Winterline students?

The energy, hope for the future, and excitement of this age group is so fantastic. Students are often bursting at the seams with ideas, passions, and motivations. They inspire me on the daily and reinforce my core values. Winterline students are unique, brave, and willing to take a path less traveled in order to live deeply. That speaks volumes to me.

What’s your favorite skill to learn/teach on Winterline?

Getting SCUBA certified with students last year was an absolute treat, even though it really challenged me individually! As far as teaching, I really enjoy facilitating dialogues and activities that center on identity, intersecting identities, and personal values. Some really incredible conversation and bonding tends to happen during these, and I find them to be so powerful. Also, I know American Sign Language and love to teach signs when students are interested in learning! winterline, field advisor, Hillevi Johnson

What’s something new you learned last year as a Field Advisor that you’re most excited to use again this year?

This is a bit of an abstract answer, but I’m most excited to use my knowledge of the first Trimester and what my new student group has likely already seen and experienced together. Stepping in as a Trimester 2/3 Field Advisor is an exciting challenge because the group is already bonded and familiar with each other. I’m really excited to dive in with my squad in new countries and skills having the experience that I do with a Trimester 1 group.

Have you traveled anywhere new since you wrapped up your last Winterline gap year?

Yes! I spent three recent months working with American study abroad students in the Greek city of Thessaloniki. It was wonderful to get to know so many different corners of mainland Greece, especially nature locations that are lesser-known to international visitors. I also got to explore Sofia and Plovdiv, Bulgaria. winterline, field advisor, Hillevi Johnson

Tell us a new fun fact about yourself!

While living in Greece, I ran my first international half-marathon (third total)! Running is usually my go-to exercise during travel and it’s extremely meditative for me. winterline, field advisor, Hillevi Johnson

 

Meet the Field Advisors: Jessica Castellan

Where are you from originally?

Guatemala City, Guatemala

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

I’ve been working in outdoor education and running travel programs the past few years. My love for travel and commitment to education and growth brought me to Winterline.winterline, gap year, jessica castellan

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

Travel has always been part of my family’s culture and running travel programs was one of those things where I was in the right place at the right time. I fell in love with it immediately.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

To keep learning and to be able to mentor others to travel responsibly.

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

Safety comes above everything. As a solo female traveler, you learn to always be looking out for yourself. The world, as beautiful as it is, comes with risks, and I’ve been trained professionally and throughout my travels on how to take care of others and myself in the most diligent way.winterline, gap year, jessica castellan

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

This is a tough one. I’ve had the opportunity to experience so much in every season and environment  around the globe from reindeer sledding in Norway, to getting lost in the Amazon in Peru, to spending a night sleeping under the stars in Thar Desert in India. I’m nothing but grateful for every single one of my travels, and for all the history and personal lessons I get to learn.

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I’m a jazz, tap and ballet dancer! Dance and photography are my artistic ways to express myself.winterline, gap year, jessica castellan

Meet the Field Advisors: Sam Forti

Where are you from originally?

Columbus, Ohio

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

I’ve always loved the outdoors and wanted to travel. When I found out I could do both, professionally I took my first instructor job and never looked back.

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

My first major travel experience was studying abroad in Mongolia with SIT for one semester in college.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

SCUBA!

winterline, gap year, sam forti
Sam and his fellow Field Advisors at orientation

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

I really enjoy helping feel comfortable and confident when it’s their first time in the backcountry or immersed in nature.

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

Getting to track and trail the Big 5 (Elephant, Rhino, Buffalo, Lion, Leopard) and other animals in South Africa.

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I’m good at finding four-leaf clovers and can make a flute out of a plastic straw.

Meet the Field Advisors: Joselin Hernández

Where are you from originally?

I am from Nicaragua, a country full of lakes, volcanoes and beautiful beaches, and warmhearted people. Most of my family still lives there.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

I have worked with different organizations focusing on community service, leadership and global education for students abroad. Later in my career I started working on managerial roles & I realized where I could really contribute the most was in the field, working directly with student groups, as a mentor, as a curriculum designer. Winterline was the perfect next step, to be back in the field, to see and experience firsthand with the students the wins, the joys, the challenges and the personal growth that come from international travel.joselin hernandez, winterline, gap year

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

I remember my grandmother taking me on local excursions in Nicaragua, which fed the travel bug inside of me from early on. I decided to do my bachelor’s degree on Tourism Management, with the desire to work on sustainable tourism. I had my first experience abroad when I was 18. I went to Panama on my own for 10 days. I saw the tremendous power travel had on me, pushing me out of my comfort zone & expanding my perspectives on life. 

This trip to Panama motivated me to seek job opportunities where I could facilitate experiential learning experiences for youth abroad, which is how I began working with groups of American students in Nicaragua in 2009. From then on, I have worked in this field in different countries, mostly in Latin America.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

I believe Winterline is an incredible opportunity for growth in so many areas: personally, professionally, socially. The skills portion of the program makes it worthwhile, and its approach to mentoring students to become increasingly more independent and self-sufficient as the program progresses is incredible. I am excited to try and embrace skills with curiosity, enthusiasm and open-mindedness together with students. I am most excited about Rancho Matastal, where we will be learning natural construction techniques, since this is one of my biggest passions. I have done several workshops on Bamboo and Cobb Building Techniques in the past and want to deepen my knowledge of it.joselin hernandez, winterline, gap year

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

I am 100% committed to support both the students in this journey, and the local partners in each country that have worked so hard to make each learning piece of the program and incredible experience for the students.

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

Exploring the Ecuadorian Amazon rain forest and being mesmerized by the lush and dense vegetation and diversity of animals, I once saw a panther drinking water from a stream, not so far from me. Interacting with indigenous communities, and their traditions and ceremonies, learning from their plant medicine.joselin hernandez, winterline, gap year

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I speak 4 languages. Spanish is my native language, I learnt English while in high school. Then I moved to France to teach Spanish, where I simultaneously learned French. I went to study Tourism Management and Teachers Training in Austria for 2 years and learned German, which I am still studying. German has been the hardest one to learn.joselin hernandez, winterline, gap year

Meet the Field Advisors: Carlos Gustavo Moriera-Alvarez

Where are you from originally?

I am originally from Costa Rica, I was raised in the mountains of Heredia Province, surrounded by wonderful landscapes and coffee fields all around. I now live in London, but will move soon to Canada.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

I decided to become a Field Advisor because I got to meet 3 WL students 2 years ago when I designed one of the ISP they enrolled in Monteverde. I liked the spirit they had, I loved the way they were just trying to figure out their lives and I wanted to be a part of it since they all told me that they would like me to lead along their side. I wanted to be able to inspire and help them reach their goals and potential.

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

I started teaching when I was 20, I was traveling and doing a lot of grassroots development back then… I got to work in with students in Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama. I taught in tough urban and rural, same as for indigenous and afro communities within those countries. I wanted to change the world back then, that spark of altruism started my travels. Then, with time, the rest of South America, some of Europe and Asia as well.

Carlos Gustavo Moriera-Alvarez, winterline, gap year
Carlos at the YMCA of the Rockies for Orientation

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

I am excited about the possibility to create a positive impact in the lives of the students in a way that allows them to discover their path, what may like or not, and to get a general idea of themselves and their role in life.

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

I am going to push them to their limits, I intend to get them to grow mentally, emotionally and spiritually, I will share with them what implies critical thinking and cultural understanding. I love to talk, I smile a lot, I am also a very peaceful person. They can always reach out and find someone that will listen to them, to try to understand what they may be feeling and experiencing.

Carlos Gustavo Moriera-Alvarez, winterline, gap year
Carlos and the other FAs at Orientation

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

There is no way to sum this up with words nor within one sole experience. I lived on the riverside communities scouting the Amazon river all the way from Iquitos (Perú) to Manaos (Brazil). I have done skydiving over the Iguazú waterfalls during sunset. I hicked/ran the Inka Trail towards Machu Picchu. I did 12h trecking over a glacier in Patagonia (Argentina) after backpacking for 300+ km. I backpacked for 1 year between Europe and Asia without a paddle, just figuring out what I wanted to do along the way. Hitchhiked/boat-hiked allover Philippines and then lead a group of volunteer teachers from diverse nationalities. There’s a lot out there in the world, these are a few of the things I remember.

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I am very goofy! And I love (in a crazy way) nature and wild animals that are not from the ecosystems I grew up in, therefore I will be with a sense of awe and wonder in these new places… just like a child.

Meeting my Winterline Coworkers

Winterline staff members are spread out across the world – from Southeast Asia, to Latin America, to various cities in the United States. In some ways, this distance is amazing. It allows us to have regional experts in the locations that our students visit, and it means someone is available for assistance in every time zone. However, by far the biggest downside of this distance is that it’s difficult for our staff members to spend time together in person.

There are coworkers I’ve spoken to almost every day for the past two years over the phone, through text, or on a video call – yet we’d never met in person. That is, until September 3rd, when the majority of our office staff met up in Winter Park, Colorado for a staff retreat! We flew in from across the world, with our farthest staff member coming in from Cambodia and our nearest arriving from other parts of Colorado. We also got to spend time with a few members of our sister organization, Thinking Beyond Borders.

winterline, gap year, staff retreat
Colorado views

Now, “work retreat” might sound like an oxymoron to some people, but for many of us, this time together only solidified our passion for Winterline. By far the highlight of these days was getting to know my coworkers on a deeper level! We covered all the basics that just don’t come up over meetings: where people are from, where they went to college, whether they have siblings. But we also got to connect much further. I learned what the perfect day for my coworkers would look like, which values they hold most esteemed, and what their individual goals for the year are.

winterline, gap year, staff retreat
All smiles from Ashley, our Director of Student Services, and Cara, our VP of Sales and Marketing

We sat around and talked, of course, to figure this out, but I also learned a lot about my coworkers through our activities! We participated in a ropes course, just like our students do at orientation. This day was so much fun and it was so inspiring to see how each and every person gave their all. We took risks, we supported each other, and we celebrated each other’s accomplishments. Yet, no one pressured each other to go faster or to complete a course that was too challenging for that individual. This balance of respect for each other’s boundaries and encouragement to push each other to do our best came naturally to our team, and is something that reflects in our workplace relationships, as well.

winterline, gap year, staff retreat
Our Admissions Advisor Nora conquering the ropes course

I think it’s important for you, our students and families, to understand this aspect of our company. Comprehending what goes on behind the scenes or picturing who the individuals are that make up Winterline is hard. Even I have had trouble comprehending this information at times, being separated from the rest of the team!

But let me tell you this: I already knew that Winterline is made up of the most dedicated, passionate individuals. From this staff retreat, I learned that this work ethic comes from strength, diversity, and integrity in my our personal lives. Having a team composed of such well-rounded people allows us to offer a program that allows you or your student to grow and learn, take risks and challenge yourself, and become your best self.

winterline, gap year, staff retreat
Showing some love to our coworkers!

I’m already looking forward to our next retreat. And if you have the chance to talk to any of our incredible staff members, whether it’s about work or not, take us up on it! We’re always happy to meet you, support you, and help you figure out what the right path is for you.

Meet the Field Advisors: Jamie Hackbarth

Where are you from originally?

Columbus, Ohio! Most recently I call home Denver, Colorado.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

I choose to become a field advisor because I believe in the transformational power of experiential education. I experienced the positive impacts of learning outside of the walls of the classroom and want to share that experience with young people today to shape and expand their worldview.

winterline, gap year, jamie hackbarth
Hiking Mont Fitz Roy in Patagonia

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

I began traveling during high school down to Honduras to assist at an orphanage for children with HIV/AIDS. This experience made me hungry to keep learning from other cultures and people from different life experiences, which led me to study abroad throughout Central America and Barcelona, Spain. After college, I served with the Peace Corps in rural Peru, which is where I began teaching and mentoring young adults. I continued my teaching over the past several years with the State of Colorado by leading educational programs for entrepreneurs and small business owners. I continue to travel for personal growth reasons throughout the world every year and am excited to do so with Winterline!

winterline, jamie hackbarth, gap year
Holding Nala in her Peace Corps community in Peru (brought home the dog!)

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

I am most excited to share my passion about global experiential education with students, and mentor them through this process.

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

I truly believe in the power of authenticity, and bringing that to grow and learn from every experience and person you encounter.

winterline, jamie hackbarth, gap year
Kayaking through Chicago

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

Sky-diving over the Great Barrier Reef and exploring the Amazon Jungle with locals!

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

As a kid, I used to perform in half-time college basketball games as a mini ‘Harlem Globetrotter’! Ask me how to spin a ball on your finger.

winterline, gap year, jamie hackbarth
Hanging out in Machu Picchu

Location Spotlight: Hanifl Centre

Hanifl Centre, an outreach of the Woodstock School in Mussoorie, India, is an outdoor education center in the Himalaya where Winterline students stay during Trimester 2 of their gap year. 

The centre’s full name is The Hanifl Centre for Outdoor Education and Environmental Study, and it was established in 2003 by Woodstock School alumni Suzanne and Paul Hanifl. The Hanifl’s founded the centre as a way to expand upon skills and knowledge of outdoor education for students and visitors alike.

hanifl centre, india, winterline, gap year
Photo By: Emma Mays

To pursue this mission, the Hanifl Centre offers a catalogue of courses ranging from just a few days in length to an entire semester abroad. Some of these courses are on topics like Wilderness First Aid. The Hanifl Centre defines wilderness as “ being an hour away from definitive medical care, which makes it relevant to most rural and urban settings in India.” The Outdoor Leadership Course is another example, which covers two main topics: leadership and outdoor skills. Some of the focuses here are conflict management and risk management, as well as functional map reading, ropes skills, and Leave No Trace ethics.

So what does a visit to the Hanifl Centre look like for a Winterline student? Hanifl Centre’s campus has both a dormitory and classrooms stocked with resources for learning, scientific equipment, and outdoors gear. In order to be environmentally friendly, the building utilizes a passive solar space-heating system and an active solar water-heating system!hanifl centre, india, winterline, gap year

Over your two week stay on campus, you’ll hone a variety of skills, starting off with a multi-day course in disaster medicine. Once you’re confident in these skills, you and your peers will take off on a week-long trek in the Himalayan Mountains! Finally, to wind down from your adventure, you’ll finish off with another multi-day course in which you practice yoga and meditation.

Interested in having this experience for yourself? Join us next year to visit Hanifl Centre and so many more partners on our 2020 gap year!

Meet the Field Advisors: Devin Duffy

Where are you from originally?

I was born and raised in Colorado: in Denver and then I moved to Centennial at a very young age.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

Devin Duffy, winterline, gap year
Alta, Utah

I love to travel, especially with a small group of like minded individuals with common goals and aspirations.

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

Just after college I took a semester in Kenya with NOLS, and then was invited on another NOLS course (Outdoor Educators course in Tanzania) with 12 East Africans and just 4 Americans. These experiences had a profound impact on me.  From there my path was somewhat clear that I wanted to pursue a life in outdoor/experiential education. The very next summer I started working for “Adventures Cross Country” and did so for the next six consecutive summers leading mostly international trips.  Through these experiences I fell in love with teaching and traveling.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

Everything really! Especially the nature of learning through doing, as well as the variety of the skills students will acquire on this experience.

Devin Duffy, winterline, gap year
Sri Lanka

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

The most important thing that I would want Winterline students and parents to know about me is that I am very safety conscious. When it comes to managing risk I am a big proponent of “prevention” being the best medicine, however if an injury or accident does occur, I will do my best to administer the proper care as a certified Wilderness First Responder, both physically and emotionally.

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

Wow, tough question… I would have to say that the most riveting realization is that in my 5 seasons working in the Indian Himalayas with NOLS I experienced within the communities we trekked through is how the people with the least amount of wealth or personal possessions are the ones to openly give the most.  People who are way below any poverty line give vegetables they’ve grown, offer chai and a place to stay, and expect absolutely nothing in return.  It’s simply amazing and heart wrenching at the same time.

Devin Duffy, winterline, gap year
Indian host family

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I have traveled to all seven continents, and earned a paycheck on six of them. So one of my next goals is to work in Africa.

Devin Duffy, winterline, gap year
Everest base camp

Meet the Field Advisors: Ellen Molander

Where are you from originally?

I am originally from Cincinnati, Ohio.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

After many years as a classroom teacher working in international education I began to feel stagnant and stuck. I wanted to continue working in education with students, but in a different capacity, outside of the classroom. I am passionate about travel, social emotional learning, self discovery and hands on skills based learning. My search for a new career path within education brought me to experiential ed, leading summer programs for high school students. It was through this work that I discovered gap year programs and began leading semesters.winterline, gap year, ellen molander

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

I studied Early Childhood Education in University and began my teaching career in the traditional classroom setting. Having always regretted not studying abroad, after my first year of teaching, I began looking for international teaching opportunities. It was then that I packed up and moved to Guatemala to teach 3rd and 4th grade. Upon arrival I was immediately bit by the travel bug! Fast forward 11 years and I’ve never looked back. I’ve lived, taught or traveled on nearly every contenent.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

I truly believe that travel has the ability to break down barriers, change perspectives, and open hearts and minds. I am excited to share this journey with students while traveling through Latin America, a region that has become my home over the last 11 years and is near and dear to my heart. winterline, gap year, ellen molander

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

Thats a hard one! I love to laugh and have fun. I’m extremely compassionate and caring and dedicated to what I do. I don’t believe in living inside the “box”

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

So hard to pick! While living and working in East Africa I had the opportunity to see so many incredible animals in the wild. Something that I never dreamed I would do in my life. In Uganda we tracked white rhino on foot, in Zanzibar I swam with wild dolphins in the Indian Ocean, and in Tanzania I went on countless safaris and saw more animals than I ever thought possible.winterline, gap year, ellen molander

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I am a certified yoga teacher. When I’m not leading student groups you can find me in my mat practicing or leading classes. winterline, gap year, ellen molander

Meet the Field Advisors: Felipe Buitrago

Where are you from originally?

I am from Bogota, the capital of Colombia, situated in the middle of the Andes.

Why did you choose to become a field advisor?

It excites me to be back in the “field’” once again and witness the power of other ways of learning unfolding through transformational experiences. I think that as an FA I’ll be able to support young people to articulate, in action and in conversation, the narratives of their own journey.felipe buitrago, winterline, gap year

How did you begin teaching/traveling?

My teaching career started back in 2010 at Earlham College, as a Language and Literature program assistant for the Latin American and Spanish department. During that time I was able to support curriculum, lesson plans, and developed collaborative research with faculty.

Traveling has been a part of my life ever since I was granted a scholarship to finish the International Baccalaureate school diploma at a boarding school in Montezuma, NM. Continuing, with my undergraduate education in a small liberal arts school in Richmond, IN, followed by an MA in Outdoor Education; a program between universities in the UK, Norway and Germany. Currently, I live and work for an international school in Berlin, Germany.

What are you most excited for about Winterline?

I’m thrilled to be part of an organization that is able to imagine and encourage other ways of learning. I believe that Winterline’s exposure to different skills, scenarios, environments, and cultures is key in a course of imagining new processes of active learning and self-discovery.felipe buitrago, winterline, gap year

What’s the most important thing students and parents should know about you?

I feel honored to be part and accompany the journey of a group of students that choose to explore their curiosity, step beyond their comfort zone, and acknowledge their privilege while preparing for life.

What’s the most incredible thing you’ve seen or done while traveling?

Tracking a pack of wolves in Yellowstone National Park (Lamar Valley) in a research study back in 2010. For four weeks I was able to learn about and understand the effect on the overall health and impact of the reintroduction of the wolves into the ecosystem of the park.felipe buitrago, winterline, gap year

Tell us a fun fact about yourself.

I’m a big fan of urban gardening. Currently growing in my small balcony: Green beans, a pumpkin, avocado trees, figs, tomatoes, strawberries, coffee, pepper, sweet potato, and two beautiful cucumbers.felipe buitrago, winterline, gap year