Bridging the Gap with Oliver

 

Give us a quick overview of what to expect from reading your book!

 

Bridging the Gap dives into the stories of people from all different walks of life who have found ways to incorporate travel into their lives and encountered incredible results. From stronger GPAs throughout school to higher job satisfaction across a career, travel proves itself a valuable asset in driving meaning and fulfillment during all stages of life.

The book offers strategies, stories, and suggestions for how travel can and should be included in every period of life for any lifestyle. Ultimately, my hope is that reading Bridging the Gap will encourage anyone to seek out travel and gap year experiences and point them in the right direction to make it happen. 

All proceeds are going to COVID relief so we can all get back to traveling soon! 

 

What was the hardest aspect of writing/publishing a book?

 

I think the hardest aspect was finding the confidence to move forward with the final steps of publishing. There are always new ideas popping up in my head for things I would want to add or change in the manuscript. Allowing myself to feel confident in where the book is as a representation of that time and place while I continue to grow forward was a valuable challenge to navigate. 

Did you learn/perfect a new skill from this process? If so, what?

 

Diligence and time management are skills I’ll always be working on but were definitely improved over the process of writing Bridging the Gap. Hopping back into the manuscript as frequently as possible and just moving along day by day helped me hone in on my focus and dedication toward the project. 

 

What inspired you to write and publish an entire book about your gap year?

 

The book is actually not about my own gap year. I wanted to write Bridging the Gap to serve as a useful tool of encouragement for people who want to travel more but aren’t sure how. When I set off on my first gap year with Winterline, there weren’t many resources to support my exploration into the idea and I hope Bridging the Gap can be that for other people. Since Winterline, I’ve been able to travel in a wide range of ways across different periods of time. People always ask me how they can do something similar, so I wanted to write a book that highlights a bunch of ways various people have made room for travel in their respective lifestyles. Bridging the Gap highlights students, young professionals, digital nomads, retirees, and more who have all successfully incorporated travel into their lives. 

 

What did you gain from your gap year? What do you think was the most beneficial aspect of taking a gap year?

 

My gap year experience with Winterline helped me realize that travel and exploration can be staples in my life. I was exposed to so many people who were doing exciting things all across the globe and I realized there was no one concrete path I needed to take moving forward. The degree of confidence and independence I felt leaving Winterline has been hugely beneficial in enabling me to take the reins on my education and career journey. bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

 

What did Winterline do specifically that benefitted you and/or your future? Did your plans for yourself change once completing your gap year?

 

Winterline supported an experience focused on exploration and breadth of perspective. Everyone involved really encouraged expanding your horizons to consider new vantage points toward life. Heading into my gap year, I had deferred admissions to Vanderbilt University in Nashville Tennessee where I later enrolled and have since graduated from. The lessons I learned from Winterline grew and were instrumental parts in supporting my pursuit of travel over the past 5 years. Without Winterline, I doubt I would have found myself doing nearly as much of what brings me meaning and joy now. 

 

What do you think students should consider this Fall if their college plans have changed?

 

I think now is the perfect time to consider a gap year. International travel may not be immediately available, but taking the time to craft a year of experience that brings you meaning outside of a school setting is invaluable. Developing independence and confidence while leaning into a curiosity for your different passions will not only make you a better student when it comes time to head to university, it will invigorate an excitement for learning. 

 

Any other advice for students in this current situation?

 

Start small. A gap year doesn’t need to be a massive leap into the unknown where you leave everything behind and start anew. It can be, but often, it starts with a simple commitment to yourself to try something different. Plan out a week-long trip where you separate yourself from whatever your day-to-day might be. It could be a week camping away from work, a handful of days road tripping to a new part of the country, or flying to a place you’ve always wanted to visit but never made the time. 

The week will give a taste of what it’s like to take adventure into your own hands. Use it as motivation to start planning out what a longer commitment could look like. Every gap year will be different but each should be fueled by curiosity and passion that typically hides dormant inside our busy routines. Brainstorm a list of five things and five places that have always interested you. The list doesn’t need to make sense or add up yet – just get the ideas flowing and on paper. 

Let a friend or family member know that you’re thinking about taking time to pursue something different and share your list with them. Bounce ideas around together and pretty soon your list will start narrowing itself down and you’ll have someone to keep you motivated as you plan things out and commit to your next adventure. bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

Can you give some background on your travel experience, what led you to do choosing a gap year, and ultimately what led you to get the idea to write this book?

Toward the end of high school, I was sitting in my driveway when I received an acceptance email from what I thought was my dream university. I had been constantly working over the years for this moment but I remember feeling somewhat indifferent about the email. I was excited, but I questioned if all the work was truly worth it and what my motivations had been along the way. 

At that moment, I decided I would do something different that no one had encouraged up to that point. That something became my first gap year traveling across ten countries over nine months. Since then, I’ve pursued multiple gap year experiences living and traveling in places around the world. I wrote Bridging the Gap to encourage people to seek out travel and show that you can incorporate travel into any lifestyle at any point in an education or career journey. 

Did you find any correlations between mental health and travelling/gap years?

Definitely. A large amount of research is out there demonstrating how taking time to travel and pursue gap year experiences has positive effects on mental health and well-being. These experiences rejuvenate inspiration and excitement for life which is often sorely needed in the grind of today’s world. 

What are some of the main skills you find you learn or develop during a Gap Year/Travel?

Resiliency, creativity, and empathy. 

Things often don’t go quite according to plan while traveling. You end up in situations without much of the typical comforts you’ve come to rely on be it routines, foods, directions, or cultural norms. 

Creativity comes when you find out different ways around these obstacles. You learn to plan and alter plans independently and are exposed to a variety of ways to go about doing that. Your mind has much more time to wander and explore ideas you otherwise would’ve been too busy to lean into.

After seeing different parts of the world and living in places other than whatever was previously called home, I believe you develop a stronger sense of empathy. It’s much easier to appreciate and value the perspective of others once you’ve walked a bit in their environment. Feeling lost at times makes you much more akin to lend a hand to others whenever they may similarly be in need of some help.bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

Any advice on alternatives for people to “scratch” their travel itch during COVID?

Great question and one I’m still working on myself. I’ve found that camping and spending time outdoors has been helpful. It reminds me how much the environment right around us has to offer and is a great way to explore a bit. 

Reading and watching different travel-based stories also transports my mind for a while. I finish with an even bigger itch than before but it’s nice to get lost in a travel story for a while. 

Last thing I would add is to do some memory logging. I’ve been going back through old travel photos/videos and it’s been awesome to slow down and appreciate all the memories. Right now I’m attempting to catalog them a bit in little picture books or movies and it’s been pretty fun. 

Does a gap year/travel make you more employable? How does one reconcile gaps on a resume where they have travelled? How do they make this travel experience work in their favour?

100 percent. A gap year and travel experience signals an individual’s ability to adapt and adjust to different environments. Soft skills like adaptability, resilience, and creativity are constantly cited as the most needed attributes in the workplace that are simultaneously the most difficult to teach. 

A gap year experience allows people to refresh and refocus their career priorities. It gives time to ensure that you’re setting off toward a path you find value and meaning in. Speaking to this confidence is essential to translating the value of travel into the value you bring to the workplace. 

Pairing a gap year experience with the pursuit of a passion or skill set on the side will deliver an even more marketable skill set. The bulk of my book was written while traveling and it now serves me well in any interview. Not to mention, any travel experience is probably the best icebreaker and conversation point for an interviewer who has seen the same resume 100 times that day. 

What’s next for you? Where to next?

All this time in quarantine has left me with a pretty extensive travel list by now. I’m thinking a trip across the Trans-Siberian Railroad could be a cool way to cover some ground once we’re allowed out of the house again. 

bridging the gap, winterline, oliver

You can buy Bridging the Gap on Amazon, with all proceeds going to COVID19 relief.

Traveling the World with Liam

Maybe you’re considering a gap year for 2020. Making this decision only gets easier with more information and insight – and what better way to learn about a gap year than to follow a Winterline student through the course of their travels? Lucky for you, our 2019-2020 student Liam is creating a vlog series showcasing his Winterline experience. While some things will look a little different this year due to COVID-19, the overall purpose and goals of Winterline’s program remains the same.

Whether you’re looking for a way to have new experiences from home or learn more about a specific program, Liam will take you on an adventure through his own eyes. We’ll update this page each time Liam posts a new episode, but you can follow along or check out his other videos on Liam’s YouTube channel!

Do you have your own travel or gap year experiences you want to share? Let us know in the comments!