7 Ways to Save Money while Traveling

There’s a feeling of relief and excitement once you’ve finally saved up enough money to book a flight for the trip you’ve been dreaming of. But it’s important to keep an eye on your finances in regards to the rest of your vacation, too. From accommodations to food to experiences, you want to do the most while spending the least. Here’s a few ways to make that happen.

  1. Hostels and home-sharing sites are your friend. On a Winterline gap year, your group accommodations are included in the program cost. But if you’re traveling on your own, don’t go straight for a hotel. Hostels and sites like AirBnB or VRBO are cheaper and have the added benefit of immersing you more directly in the local culture. You’ll get more of a chance to interact with people who actually live in the area and can give you tips and recommendations to make the most of your stay.winterline, gap year, homestay
  2. Do your research on admissions prices for museums and other institutions. Museums are often a must-see to get a taste of the culture, art, and history. You shouldn’t have to miss out because you can’t afford the trip. Many museums in Europe, for example, offer free or discounted tickets for not just students but young adults up to 25! A lot of museums also offer free admission on a certain night of the month, if you can work it out so that your visit overlaps. winterline, gap year, museum
  3. Look for free activities, too! There’s plenty of equally stimulating and cultural activities that you can participate in for no cost. Check out community calendars, look on Facebook, or ask a local to find out what’s going on in the area.
  4. Use the public transportation! Calling a cab may be tempting, but taking a bus, train, or even tuk-tuk will be gentler on your wallet. Even better, again, using the public transportation will give you a more authentic experience of the country you’re in. Maybe you’ll strike up a conversation with the person next to, find a hidden gem at a random stop, or have a fun story to tell your friends. You may also find that an overnight bus or train is much cheaper than a flight and will get you to your destination all the same.winterline, gap year, tuktuk, money
  5. Don’t eat out for every meal. If you have a kitchen, you should try to take advantage and prepare your own food, even if it’s just one meal a day! However, you can save money on food even if you don’t have a kitchen to cook for yourself. There’s plenty of light meals and snacks you can make without a stove: buy food at the grocery store or the local market for breakfast or an outdoor picnic. When you do go out to eat, try to stick to the local places instead of the tourist traps.student_eating_street_food_portrait
  6. Invest in a filtered water bottle. You may have to spend on it up front, but in the long run, you’ll save money refilling your water instead of buying new bottles all day in countries where the tap water isn’t safe for tourists to drink.
  7. Keep track of your spending. Oftentimes we aren’t aware of just how much we’re spending each day. Use a spreadsheet, a notebook, or an app, and take a few minutes at the end of each day to review how much money you spent that day and what you spent it on. This will help you realize if you’re spending too much on food, for example, so tomorrow you’ll know to pack more snacks and avoid eating out. This will also help you prioritize what’s most important to you and therefore worth spending a little more on.winterline, gap year, money

How do you manage your spending while traveling? Are there any tips you’d recommend for fellow adventurers?

 

New Student Spotlight: Lucas Massolo

The Winterline Global Skills Gap Year Program travels to 10 different countries over 9 months, where students learn 100 new life skills while traveling the world with their best friends.


Thinking about taking a gap year too?

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WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

I was born in Santiago, Chile, but only lived there for about three months. I have been living in Miami, Florida for around 19 years now.

THE CONCEPT OF A GAP YEAR PROGRAM IS STILL NEW FOR MANY STUDENTS. WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE IDEA OF TAKING A GAP YEAR?

My mom’s best friend’s son runs a gap year program up in Massachusetts which I visited 3 years ago. From then on I knew I wanted to do something like it.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO TAKE A GAP YEAR?

After completing my first year of college I realized that I wasn’t ready to continue on the same path. I wasn’t feeling very motivated to excel in a certain area and I was missing adventure.

winterline, gap year, lucas massolo

WHAT SKILL ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO LEARN?

I am most excited to learn how to scuba dive in Costa Rica. I have always had a passion for the ocean and it will be very interesting to learn more about it.

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO IN THE FUTURE?

I don’t have an exact idea, but I would love to do something along the lines of music, videography, photography, and saving the environment.

HAVE YOU TRAVELED BEFORE? IF SO, WHICH TRIP HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

My favorite trip was to Barcelona. You can be at the beach, in the mountains, and in the city all in one day. And you can eat the best food in the world on the move.winterline, gap year, lucas massolo

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO GAIN FROM YOUR GAP YEAR PROGRAM AND WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD?

I expect to gain responsibility, motivation, and friendship from the gap year program.

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT YOUR FUTURE WINTERLINE PEERS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I’m always down for a good adventure.

winterline, gap year, lucas massolo

WHY WINTERLINE?

I chose Winterline because the itinerary looks amazing. Everything about it sounded perfect when I first read about it, and now I just can’t wait to begin.

TELL US SOMETHING FUN ABOUT YOU!

I love to play soccer and basketball.winterline, gap year, lucas massolo

 

Creating a Successful Travel Instagram

One of the easiest ways to keep your friends and family updated on your adventures is by sharing with everyone at once on social media. Why not take it a step further and inspire people you don’t even know to set off on a journey? Getting thousands of followers may take a bit more work than just posting pictures every now and then, so here’s a few tips to keep in mind.

  1. Set up your profile. Choose a name that’s easy to understand and search for, whether it be your real name or a fun moniker that’s relevant to the pictures you’ll be posting. Add a short description that explains who you are or what you do, and make sure that your profile is on public for maximum interaction! Of course, be sure to take precaution on any public profile: don’t share details that are too personal and don’t post anything you wouldn’t want a parent, boss, or teacher to see.winterline, gap year, instagram
  2. You don’t need an expensive camera to take good pictures, but make sure that your photos are good quality. Smartphone cameras are usually pretty reliable, and there are countless apps you can use to make your images pop. Make sure to post pictures that are visually intriguing and unique.winterline, gap year, instagram
  3. Build your aesthetic. Do you want to focus on global food? Architecture? Local people you meet while traveling? Of course, you can have a general travel profile as long as your photos all have a cohesive thread.
  4. Interact with your followers. Start your network by reaching out to friends, and friends of friends. Promote your Instagram on other social networks. Use a few, relevant hashtags that speak to your target audience. Follow similar accounts, and follow their followers, as well. This will likely inspire them to check out your profile. But don’t just be a ghost follower. Like people’s photos, comment on them, and respond to any comments they leave you. Build a relationship with your followers to keep them engaged.
  5. Don’t post too often or too little. You don’t want to clog the feed of your followers or they may get annoyed. However, post too scarcely and your followers may forget about you or unfollow. Consistency is key.
  6. Think about your caption, and make it relevant to the photo. Describe your experiences, or use a quote that sums it up. Hone your storytelling skills; nothing draws in an audience more than the combination of a stunning photo and an intriguing story.winterline, gap year, vacation
  7. Tag your location and any accounts relevant to the photo. For example, if you’re posting a photo of your food, set the location as the restaurant and tag them in the actual photo. This satisfies the curiosity of your followers and allows them to use your account as a reference for their own travels. This also increases the chance that the restaurant may repost your photo or interact with you, so their own followers will become aware of your account, too.

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    Taking in the waterfall | Photo By: Abby Dulin

Want to see how we do it? Be sure to follow our Instagram account to keep up with Winterline’s adventures!

New Student Spotlight: Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández

The Winterline Global Skills Gap Year Program travels to 10 different countries over 9 months, where students learn 100 new life skills while traveling the world with their best friends.


Thinking about taking a gap year too?

LEARN MORE


THE CONCEPT OF A GAP YEAR PROGRAM IS STILL NEW FOR MANY STUDENTS. WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE IDEA OF TAKING A GAP YEAR?

A gap year was never in my interest. This is because I thought it was useless, mainly getting a perspective from friends who have done it in recent years. However, when I was introduced to Winterline I thought that it did not resemble any of the other activities my friends have done. My interest in Winterline derives from its mission to teach 100 different skills that are essential or useful in one’s life. I was very interested in this aspect, as I saw it as an opportunity I couldn’t dismiss.Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández, winterline, gap year

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO TAKE A GAP YEAR?

I have been accepted to several universities in the US and Europe. However, I think I would profit tremendously from a gap year that would help me mature and expose me to new experiences that will give me more clarity towards my passion and path I want to take in my academic career.

WHAT SKILL ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO LEARN?

I think I am very interested in all the skills. However, the skills that interest me the most are all outdoor activities. This is because I’ve been a very outdoors person my whole life, in recent years specifically I’ve had the opportunity to practice several outdoors activities. The first to come to mind is scuba diving, this is an activity that I really enjoy and would like to learn it as a skill.Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández, winterline, gap year

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO IN THE FUTURE?

In my professional career, I want to become an entrepreneur as ideas are what passions me in life. Since I was very young I’ve been fascinated by simple ideas that now form large businesses, as a result, I’ve been very productive on thinking ideas of my own, I have several to form start-ups in the future. To follow my passion I want to study in a business orientated school that will teach me the necessary resources to reach my dream.

HAVE YOU TRAVELED BEFORE? IF SO, WHICH TRIP HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

In 2016 I participated as a volunteer in Ostional, Costa Rica. The mission of the volunteering program was to preserve and help sea turtles in the Pacific ocean. To complete this objective we had to help the sea turtles lay their eggs on the beach and take care of the baby turtles. This was my favorite trip as its the most satisfying experience of my life, I am a very animalist person as I am inspired by animals. In addition, I also met a lot of people in the program, some of which I’ve developed very strong relationships.Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández, winterline, gap year

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO GAIN FROM YOUR GAP YEAR PROGRAM AND WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD?

In the program, I hope to become an independent and mature person. I also want to develop new relationships within and outside the program, I want to open my mind to new cultures and know new people around the world. Finally, I want to develop all skills as deeply as possible and feel a profound feeling of satisfaction at the end of the experience.

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT YOUR FUTURE WINTERLINE PEERS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I want my future peers to know that I am a very down to earth person, I can describe myself as a very friendly and social person, usually never get angry, but will sometimes tell people off if they are doing a wrong thing. I am also a very communicative person and love to meet new people, I will always be trying to talk to somebody as I can barely keep my mouth shut. I am also a huge fan of soccer, as usual, I will do anything to watch the games of my team. Finally, I really like hip-hop and rap music, but you will have to put up with my Colombian music playing at full volume.Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández, winterline, gap year

WHY WINTERLINE?

Before knowing about Winterline, no other gap year program interested me, as all were too specific and superficial. I feel that Winterline is the only program that included many different activities, all for the purpose of teaching young adults on the principles of life, which is the only implication that will successfully prepare someone for the real world.

TELL US SOMETHING FUN ABOUT YOU!

I am a very good soccer player.Pablo González-Pacheco Fernández, winterline, gap year

 

Vibrancy of India

Winterline students will get to spend some considerable time exploring India. And although much of India struggles with extreme overcrowding and poverty, it is a country full of incredible landmarks, religious history, and colorful culture. Gap year student visiting this spectacular country won’t have to look far to discover a vast array of new experiences.

Making Your Journey

For many travelers, the activities and landmark sites make the biggest impact. Visitors to India have plenty of sites to explore.

  • Taj Mahal — This world-famous marble palace is an architectural wonder with an intriguing back story. You could call it the LeBron James of places to visit in India.
  • Buddhist Caves of Ajanta — These caves, which date back as far as 2nd Century BC, have tremendous artistic and religious importance. Plus, they’re really beautiful.
  • Himalayas — You can’t ask for much more from a mountain range. World’s tallest peak? Got it (Mount Everest, at 29,029 feet). Glaciers? Check – the world’s third-largest quantity of snow and ice reside there. Several climates in various spots? Uh-huh. Multiple rivers? Yep.
  • Tea Gardens — Darjeeling isn’t just a variety of tea. It’s the gorgeous area of India where this type of tea actually comes from. Cool, huh?winterline, gap year, india

Eye-Opening Facts

  • With nearly 1.3 billion residents, India contains about one-sixth of the world’s total population. Only China has more people.
  • India’s Hindu calendar has 6 seasons: spring, summer, monsoon, autumn, pre-winter, and winter.
  • It’s illegal to take Indian currency (Rupees) out of India.
  • India has the world’s lowest meat consumption per person.
  • India has more mobile phones than toilets.
  • Hinduism and Buddhism both originated in India. Hinduism is the country’s most commonly practiced religion.winterline, gap year, india

Flavors of a Nation

Like its majestic mountain peaks, Indian food isn’t subtle. It’s quite straightforward with its one-of-a-kind mixture of opposing, yet somehow complementary, flavors and consistencies – sweet vs. salty, creamy vs. spicy.

Spices like turmeric and cumin — along with consistent use of flat breads, rice and lentils, depending on the region — are major components of India’s food profile. The meats of choice are fish, chicken and mutton (that’s sheep, in case you didn’t know).

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Whether you want to try new foods or dedicate your time to a social cause, you won’t run out of fascinating places to go, people to see, and cultural nuances to experience in India.

“Leave No Trace” for Traveling on Your Gap Year

We’ve given you a look at our partner NOLS.  NOLS teaches you how to relate to the natural world in the most respectful way possible. Their Leave No Trace principles are a set of guidelines that allow you to get close to nature and enjoy the things it has to teach without doing harm. They cover everything from pre-trip planning to interacting with other people on the trail.

There’s clearly a parallel between each of these guidelines and those that we would prescribe for traveling internationally. Here are a few examples:

1. Know the regulations and special concerns for the area you’ll visit.

Depending on where you are in the world, different laws and regulations will apply. If you’re going to Bangkok, it could be pre-entry visa requirements. If you’re in the backcountry of Wyoming, the special concern could be finding clean drinking water. Venice, maybe pickpocketing.

Knowing what you’re facing before you get there can be a huge advantage, because it allows you to adapt while you still have time and other resources. You can pack your water filter, and your hidden money pouch. You can apply for that entry visa before you miss the deadline!

2. Visit in small groups. Split larger parties into groups of 4 – 6.

Each time you visit a place, you leave an imprint. Whether that’s a physical footprint, or a complex socio-cultural impact, something happens. There is no one way interaction, where you might receive a piece of a culture and not leave a mark. And traveling in smaller groups is imperative for maintaining that balance.

We all know the groups of a hundred people walking through town, matching hats, ice cream. It’s weird. Winterline always emphasizes small group sizes, whether that’s learning with a partner, or wandering through an old European town. It leaves a smaller footprint, and it also creates a stronger sense of community within the group.

Girls Hiking NOLS

3. Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter.

Whatever you bring into your campsite, you take with you. This fundamental relationship to trash, refuse, and waste, is how we approach our international travel experiences as well. At the end of every Winterline activity, you’ll probably hear a Field Advisor say, “OK let’s pick up any micro trash we see.”

The aim isn’t to be annoying. It’s to recognize and acknowledge that we are all making an impact all the time. If twenty of us leave a plastic wrapper on the floor, the world will quickly become a landfill, and that’s not what we want. We learn about marine biology because we love it. We learn about life in the slums of India because we know that humans are humans. Whether it’s marine species or humanity, our trash affects each other. The way we treat the world is how we treat ourselves. This Leave No Trace principle highlights that very important fact.

4. Preserve the past, observe but do not touch cultural or historic structures and artifacts.

Everything that humanity has built is a part of our heritage. That’s what it means to be a global citizen, to be a citizen of the world. To truly embrace this complexity is to be an inheritor of all of human history, the good and the bad, the terrible and the true.

Allowing history to be, and to coexist with the present is what allows us to transcend the limited perspectives of our own time, and thus learn. When we embrace history, observe it without damaging it, we avoid making the same mistakes of our forbears, whatever the color of their skin or the beliefs of their time.

5. Be courteous, yield to other users on the trail.

You’ll never be alone forever. At some point you’ll join others, even on the road less traveled. How you treat those people is not only a reflection on you as an individual, but all the things you represent to them. Whether that’s your nationality, your eye color, your skin color, your fresh Nike kicks, the way you allow others to express themselves and pursue the things that matter to them in those brief moments of human interaction are not forgotten.

What gets established as culture doesn’t happen in large fell swoops, mandated from on high, but in the minutiae of fleeting moments, kind gestures, bitter memories. The way we treat others inches our society towards behaving in that way.

How would you like to be treated? And to go beyond the Golden Rule — which would have you do unto others as you would have them do unto you — how would others wish to be treated? Because we’re not all the same. That’s why we travel in the first place!

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6. Let nature’s sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises.

To soak up the world, it’s best to listen. Whether that’s on the trail or in the bustling streets of Mumbai, this Leave No Trace principle bears its own weight. The sound of the birds, of the singing of water taxis and tuktuks, of your peers laughing, these are the real joys of travel.

When you leave your home, don’t leave this principle behind. No country should be proud of having a boisterous reputation. The ability to learn is founded on the ability to listen. See the world, but also listen.

Does travel make you live longer?

Looking for a reason to postpone work and school for a journey around the world? Look no further: studies are showing that traveling more is related to living longer.winterline, gap year, vacation

That’s right. A 40-year study conducted by the University of Helsinki found that those who took three weeks or less annual vacation had a 37% greater chance of dying younger than people who take more time to travel.

In 1974, the university began tracking 1,200 businessmen who were identified as being at risk for heart disease due to weight, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels. The results were presented to the European Society of Cardiology in 2018. In addition to a shorter life span, those who traveled less were less productive at work and had more trouble sleeping. winterline, gap year, vacation

Though the study only tracked men, these results are significant enough to encourage to take a vacation! And they make sense. Overworking can lead to higher stress levels, which can affect your body, emotions, and behavior, leading to many health problems.

Professor Timo Strandberg warns, “don’t think having an otherwise healthy lifestyle will compensate for working too hard and not taking holidays…Vacations can be a good way to relieve stress.” It’s never too early to start thinking about how the way you live impacts your health. So if you think going to college or entering the workforce right away might be too overwhelming for you, consider taking some time off and refreshing yourself.winterline, gap year

And remember, this study comes from Finland, which is consistently ranked the happiest place on earth to live. Sounds like they know what they’re doing – maybe you should take some vacation time to visit!

New Student Spotlight: Jared Franklin

The Winterline Global Skills Gap Year Program travels to 10 different countries over 9 months, where students learn 100 new life skills while traveling the world with their best friends.


Thinking about taking a gap year too?

LEARN MORE


THE CONCEPT OF A GAP YEAR PROGRAM IS STILL NEW FOR MANY STUDENTS. WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE IDEA OF TAKING A GAP YEAR?

I was introduced to a gap year in the spring of my senior year.winterline, gap year, jared franklin

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO TAKE A GAP YEAR?

I’m not quite sure what I want to do with my future and I’m hoping that through traveling the world and being pushed outside my comfort zone, I will find inspiration that will help guide me towards a future career.

WHAT SKILL ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO LEARN?

The skill I am excited to learn is diving. I can’t wait to see what it is like to explore underneath the ocean.winterline, gap year, jared franklin

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO IN THE FUTURE?

I still have no idea of what I want to do with my future.

HAVE YOU TRAVELED BEFORE? IF SO, WHICH TRIP HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

I have traveled many places. The trip that stands out to me is the one I took to Nicaragua for a school program the summer of my junior year. I liked learning about the culture and helping out in the community.winterline, gap year, jared franklin

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO GAIN FROM YOUR GAP YEAR PROGRAM AND WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD?

With the opportunity to learn over 100 different skills,  I hope to gain inspiration for my future, as well as friendships and memories to last a lifetime.

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT YOUR FUTURE WINTERLINE PEERS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I am a great friend, and my passion is in helping others.winterline, gap year, jared franklin

WHY WINTERLINE?

In researching many different gap year programs, I found that Winterline had the best reputation. I loved how Winterline travels to 10 different countries and partners up with experts in each country to teach skills I would not otherwise have the opportunity to learn.

TELL US SOMETHING FUN ABOUT YOU!

I have size 15 feet.

winterline, gap year, jared franklin

6 Things To Pack For A Gap Year That You Probably Didn’t Think Of Yet

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In preparation for our gap year programs, we create detailed lists of things students should absolutely not leave home without. Our field advisors travel with our students through India, the Colorado wilderness, Costa Rica, and beyond, and never fail to come back with sharper insights.

These prep lists cover everything from technology, the bare essentials, safety protocol, travel bags, toiletries, daily wear, even swimwear and sun protection.

Here are six things we recommend if you’re heading off for what could be the craziest year of your life.

1. Ziploc bags.

Ziplocs can be a lifesaver. They serve the same purpose as waterproof stuff sacks, but they can be used for a wide variety of needs and stuff themselves into the small corners of your bag. If you’ve ever needed to keep something dry, fresh, or not spilling over all your other stuff, you’ve known the value of ziplocs. They’ll help you keep items like notebooks, medicines, cameras, high-calorie snacks, and other items dry. Pack 5-10 large ziplocs for your trip.

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2. Immunization / vaccination card.

Too many people forget this item when traveling around the world. The thing is, you never know when you’ll need to show your immunization history. You could get stuck by a twisty barbed wire fence, or it could be a matter of getting a visa for a country on your bus detour. Your immunization/vaccination card will help expedite some of the most stressful situations you will hopefully never face while traveling the world. Never leave home without it!

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3. GoPro Hero 4.

Inevitably, you’ll want great photos of your experience, something to remember all the crazy experiences you’ve had by. But if a camera can feel like it’s pulling you out of the experience, strap a GoPro to yourself and you’re good to go. You get to keep both your hands free and do whatever it is you’re doing, knowing you can look back on it and laugh someday.

A solid camera will capture your experiences while not making you feel like you’re walking on broken glass. The GoPro Hero 4 takes high quality video, photo, and timelapse, and won’t break if you drop it under water.

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4. Rashguard Shirts

If you’re planning on doing any water activities, you’ll always be running the risk of rashes, as well as plenty of sun exposure. A rashguard shirt will guard you from rashes, obviously, as well as keep you from getting super sunburned or having to put on sunblock every 2 hours on every part of your body. Plus the tanlines look really cool.

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5. Water bottles and bladders

Every time you leave your camp or hostel for the next place, as a rule of thumb, you’ll want to have 2L of water on you. You never know when you’re going to fill up next, especially if you’re in a country or region without a lot of clean water (it happens). Wide-mouth Nalgene bottles are extremely useful for a variety of contexts, from just water, to mixing in hydration salts, iodine, and emergency medicines. They’re also easy to clean. Bring two of them.

Nalgenes take up space, even when they have nothing in them. If you prefer a more flexible shape, a water bladder can be useful. It’s not recommended to mix things into them, and they’re less easy to clean, but they’re adaptability and size is definitely a strong point.

Either way, don’t go without water. 3 days without it, and “you’ll perish.”

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6. Moleskin blister padding

Nothing will bum your day out more than blisters (besides no water). Bring the right socks and break in your shoes before any long treks and you still may need a little extra padding and relief. Moleskin padding can keep you going when your feet are dead, but your legs are fine. Heck, even the US Army uses it. But it can be hard to find in far off places, so don’t leave home without it.

Is there anything special you think we forgot? What’s the number one item you would want with you while traveling?

How to Market Your Gap Year

We already have the research that shows studying abroad increases your likelihood of finding a job. But how do you market your gap year or study abroad time to show potential employers what you’ve learned? Here are some tips for polishing your resume and LinkedIn profile to maximize your chances of your travel paying off.

The Resume

  • This should be pretty self-explanatory, but you never know: make sure you actually include your travels on your resume! Don’t just leave a blank space in your chronology. If your travels don’t fit under your work or education experiences, try titling a new section: “International Travel,” “Relevant Experiences,” or “Relevant Skills.” Or, play around to find something else that you feel encapsulates your time abroad.winterline, gap year
  • Tailor the resume for your anticipated next move. You probably accomplished a lot on your gap year, and as great as it all was, it isn’t all relevant to every position. Based on the position you’re applying for, your resume may be a little different. Pay attention to the job description and requirements and use the skills you learned that show your capability for the spot. There are some basic skills that are applicable to every job, like communication skills, so experiences like developing interpersonal skills with Cambodian monks would fit on every resume.winterline, gap year
  • Using action words is a generally good tip, but it’s especially important when you’re summing up an experience as all-encompassing as your gap year. You really want to emphasize the hands-on experience you’ve had by choosing powerful verbs: think “conducted research on lionfish” instead of “learned about marine life.” Be precise, concise, and specific!winterline, gap year
  • Give yourself credit for your work! Sometimes we pick up on skills we aren’t even aware of. For example, if you ran a travel Instagram, you have social media marketing skills. If you ran a travel blog, maybe you picked up on SEO/SEM. Think about what you did on your gap year and push it one step further – what did you gain from each of those experiences?winterline, gap year

The Interview

  • Think about a challenge you overcame while on your gap year, and be ready to talk about it! Maybe you had trouble adjusting to a new location, or you tried a new skill and failed at it. Employers will always want to know about your initiative, adaptability, resilience, and crisis management skills, as well as your level of self-awareness and ability to plan for future issues.winterline, gap year
  • Prepare real-life examples about your skills and experiences. You can’t put every detail onto your resume, but you can elaborate with anecdotes once you’ve grabbed the interviewer’s attention with your standout resume!winterline, gap year

Remember that your resume is just an overview of you and your capabilities. You want it to be succinct and enticing enough that employers want to know more. The interview is the place to really shine and get into the details and examples you’ve already outlined. If you get overwhelmed, just remember how much you’ve already accomplished and it’ll seem less daunting!

 

New Student Spotlight: Lauren Speroni

The Winterline Global Skills Gap Year Program travels to 10 different countries over 9 months, where students learn 100 new life skills while traveling the world with their best friends.


Thinking about taking a gap year too?

LEARN MORE


THE CONCEPT OF A GAP YEAR PROGRAM IS STILL NEW FOR MANY STUDENTS. WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE IDEA OF TAKING A GAP YEAR?

I’ve heard of the idea in high school when I learned about alternatives to going straight to college.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO TAKE A GAP YEAR?

It seemed like the perfect opportunity to learn more outside the classroom setting and to learn about yourself. winterline, gap year, lauren speroni

WHAT SKILL ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO LEARN?

I am most excited to learn circus skills because it seems intriguing and so different from all the others.

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO IN THE FUTURE?

I am leaning towards doing international work either in a business or diplomatic setting.

HAVE YOU TRAVELED BEFORE? IF SO, WHICH TRIP HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

I have traveled to many European countries and places within the US. My favorite trip has to be to Alaska because the environment and wildlife are so unique and the Northern Lights were amazing.winterline, gap year, lauren speroni

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO GAIN FROM YOUR GAP YEAR PROGRAM AND WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD?

I want to come from this with many great experiences and memories along with growth and skills I would not have been able to get anywhere else.

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT YOUR FUTURE WINTERLINE PEERS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I might seem reserved at first but I warm up quickly. I love to goof around and blast music and dance.

WHY WINTERLINE?

Winterline has the length and structure I wanted out of a gap year. It really ties together all the traveling and skills I’m looking for.

TELL US SOMETHING FUN ABOUT YOU!

I can tie a cherry stem in my mouth.winterline, gap year, lauren speroni

 

Alumni Spotlight: Leela Barlow

What did you do when you returned from your Gap Year? Did you head straight to college? The workforce? Trade school? Something else?

I spent the summer as a job site manager for a painting company. Glamorous I know, but I created a great relationship with my co-workers and my boss because of the communication and interview skills I learned from Living on Purpose and Startup Institute. In the Fall I started my first year at University of California – Santa Barbara to study Global Studies and Political Science. My time spent travelling piqued my interest in international politics and global processes of culture, and now I get to pursue that from an academic perspective at one of the top public schools in the nation. winterline, gap year, leela barlow

How has your Winterline experience affected your post-gap year plan? Is it different than what you had planned out before the program?

My post gap-year plans didn’t change as much as they became more specific. I applied to university in the middle of Winterline, knowing I wanted to pursue tertiary education, but it wasn’t until after Winterline that I knew what I actually wanted to study and how I wanted to make my impact on the world.

How have you changed since completing Winterline? Do you notice anything different about yourself since the program?

Yes. A million times yes. Winterline stripped away everything that my environment had layered upon me, and left just the core of my personality, my most genuine self. It wasn’t just by chance, I spent all year consciously self-reflecting, but I don’t think I would’ve considered it at all without the experience of changing my environment every week to see what remained. Winterline showed me how to accept and present my most genuine self, and it’s changed the way I interact with people of all different backgrounds for the better. Now when I walk in a room I stand tall, knowing who I am and how to interact with others. winterline, gap year, leela barlow

What was your favorite skill to learn and why?

Maybe it’s a typical answer, but I really enjoyed our mixology class in Cambodia. It was really fun to learn how to make a good drink, and if I’m being honest, I think it’s made me less prone to irresponsible drinking habits now that I’m at college. I’d argue that being peer pressured into drinking poor quality liquor is a little less appealing when you’ve had the chance to sit at a bar and drink something that doesn’t burn all the way down and leave you broken the next morning. winterline, gap year, leela barlow

What was your favorite trimester and why? Is there a specific location that you catch yourself thinking about from your program more than others?

I truly enjoyed Trimester 2. Asia’s history never fails to surprise and humble me. My favourite place was probably Siem Reap because it was one of the first times we got to interact with the other cohort. Plus, we got to do circus school; as it turns out I’m not bad at aerial silks.

What did you do for your Independent Study Project? Have you continued using that skill/have you used that skill since the project occurred?

I went to Budapest to refine my photography skills, and it was truly my favourite week out of the entire year. I had a chance to take this new version of myself that I had uncovered and bring her out into the real world. I use the photography skills I learned all the time because it’s a passion of mine, but more than that, I take the independent travel skills I acquired with me every time I set out on a new trip. To be able to arrive in a foreign place and not feel lost or vulnerable is something I truly think every person needs to have. I believe the attitude you arrive with plays a huge part in your safety and competence wherever you end up.

winterline, gap year, leela barlow
Photo by Leela

What’s one piece of advice that you would give a future Winterliner?

This is not a vacation! You are going to have to work hard to be present, or you’re wasting your time. Take feedback and try it on, give feedback unapologetically but also with empathy. This is your chance to learn and grow without sacrificing your GPA — so take it! You will learn so much about the world on Winterline, it’s hard not to, but if you make use of every opportunity or challenge you’re presented with, you’ll also learn a lot about yourself, and that’s what will get you through any future endeavour.

Do you still keep in touch with your cohort?

Absolutely. We keep each other updated on Snapchat all the time, some more than others, but in all honesty I feel we’ve gotten even closer since the program ended over a year ago. We still share our personal experiences and struggles with each other, and give each other support despite the miles between us. It’s like having a secret only twelve people know. No one else quite understands the experiences we had, and I think that keeps us in contact as what we learned evolves and translates into our daily lives.

What is one of your favorite memories from your program?

One of my favourite memories was in India during our small group project week. I stayed in Pune and learned about Art Therapy, Dance, and Hindustani music at Artsphere with Patrick Neafsey and Liam McLees. The whole week was memorable, but I think my favourite part was getting to celebrate Holi, the festival of colour. I’m half Indian, so I’ve gotten the chance to participate before, but never in India, and never like we did in Pune. We scoured the local mall looking for white clothes to destroy, and we went with a group of people that had taught us Capoeira earlier in the week. When we got there, we were welcomed by people we’d never met as if we were old friends. It was wonderful to celebrate and connect with people despite whatever language or cultural barriers existed; there was just an effervescent quality to the festival unlike any I’ve ever experienced before. winterline, gap year, leela barlow


Do you think the Winterline experience has benefited your life? If so, in what way?

I could write a thirty page paper to answer this question, but for the sake of time, I’ll just give you my most pressing reason why Winterline has benefited my life. I never realized that the people I knew back home were either exactly like me, or understanding enough to let me be the way I was, good, bad, or indifferent. I was an “acquired taste,” as an old friend put it, but I thought that I would be well off enough to stay that way. On Winterline, I was living with twelve other people who didn’t understand me in the slightest, and vice versa. It took nine months of stripping away all of the preconceived notions and prejudices left behind from bad first impressions and my terrible habit of keeping people at arms distance to see why Winterline was such a good decision for me. It’s kind of hard to learn how to get along with twelve very different people without learning how to get along with everyone else too. The most useful thing I learned on Winterline was how to speak to anyone without sacrificing my own personality in the process. In other words, I learned the basics of speaking someone else’s language in my own dialect, a skill I continue to practice and that benefits me every day. winterline, gap year, leela barlow

To learn more about what some of our awesome Winterline alum are doing, check out the rest of our blog posts. 

New Student Spotlight: Micah Zimmerman

The Winterline Global Skills Gap Year Program travels to 10 different countries over 9 months, where students learn 100 new life skills while traveling the world with their best friends.


Thinking about taking a gap year too?

LEARN MORE


THE CONCEPT OF A GAP YEAR PROGRAM IS STILL NEW FOR MANY STUDENTS. WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INTRODUCED TO THE IDEA OF TAKING A GAP YEAR?

I was first introduced to a gap year around the same time that I was seriously looking at colleges, a little less than a year ago, but I didn’t give it any real thought until recently when I realized that maybe college next year wasn’t for me.winterline, gap year, micah zimmerman

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO TAKE A GAP YEAR?

I couldn’t find something that I really wanted to study and everything about Winterline looked amazing. I wanted to use this year to find out what I liked so that I could narrow down the choices for college.

WHAT SKILL ARE YOU MOST EXCITED TO LEARN?

I am really excited to do the BMW program and to scuba dive.

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO DO IN THE FUTURE?

Although I don’t know exactly what I want to do in the future, I would love to work on fixing the environment through renewable energy.winterline, gap year, micah zimmerman

HAVE YOU TRAVELED BEFORE? IF SO, WHICH TRIP HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

I have traveled before, my favorite trip was to Israel because I got to see so many historical things from my religion.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO GAIN FROM YOUR GAP YEAR PROGRAM AND WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD?

Honestly I don’t even know what to expect, but I do hope to learn a lot about myself and what I enjoy doing.winterline, gap year, micah zimmerman

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT YOUR FUTURE WINTERLINE PEERS TO KNOW ABOUT YOU?

I want my future Winterline peers to know that I am always open to be friends and I love to try and learn new things.

TELL US SOMETHING FUN ABOUT YOU!

I am double jointed in my arms (I’ll show you what I mean if you ask)winterline, gap year, micah zimmerman