Lesson #2 from My Gap Year: Try Everything

By: Ben Welbourn | May 7, 2018
Topics: Life Skills, Guest Blogger
Ben continues to share the wisdom he picked up from his gap year. This is the second post in his series.

A follow up of Ben’s first post about his gap year.

A Gap Year is a fantastic way to get some answers. Typically, more important than finding what you want to pursue, is finding out what you absolutely don’t want to pursue. Prospective gap year students should seek the greatest breadth of experiences possible in order to check off potential areas of study, and pursue the short list that remains once in college.

Designing my own gap year is still one of my greatest accomplishments. I take pride in the fact that I turned “I’m not ready for college yet” into one of the most productive years of my life. I hiked the 2,174.6-mile Appalachian Trail from Maine to Georgia, worked in a variety of industries, and taught English in Peru. In looking at potential interests that I pursued, however, I was only able to check off a few. I learned that I didn’t want to work in telemarketing or light fixture manufacturing (no surprise there), data entry, or retail. But these were the jobs that I could get straight out of high school. The good news is this lesson made me really want to get a college degree, so my first semester in college yielded my highest grades yet. The bad news? I still didn’t know what to study.

I came away from my gap year interested in education, but my lack of breadth throughout the year meant my examination of other disciplines was far from over. I started majors in communication, economics, psychology, philosophy, and anthropology. I waited until the last possible day – halfway through sophomore year – to declare my major as international relations. I wandered through more than a third of my college education. J.R.R. Tolkien was right when he wrote that, “Not all who wander are lost” – in fact, I had a pin stating that on my backpack for the entire trail that year – but when the financial stakes are as high as they are in college, it’s best to have focus.

IMGA0241.jpg

My advice to you: don’t treat your college tuition money like the entrance to a buffet. Instead, spend your gap year doing as much as possible in as many areas of interest as possible. You will become a well-rounded person, a greater asset to your school and future employer, and a more interesting person!

A skills-based gap year is the best way to ensure that when you step on campus as a freshman, you’ll know what to do next.

0 Comments +

Leave a Comment


Most Popular

My Gap Year Hasn’t Opened My Eyes to the World

By: Prathana Shrestha | January 23, 2017
Topic: Student Voices

My gap year has felt more like a holiday, getting to travel for a short vacation away from my (...)

How to Plan A Gap Year Like Malia

By: Olga Khaminwa-Joseph | March 15, 2017
Topic: Education, Gap Year Planning

The internet exploded when America’s favorite daughter, Malia Obama, announced she'd defer (...)

20 Colleges That Encourage A Gap Year

By: Julian Goetz | April 1, 2017
Topic: Education, Gap Year Planning

Taking a gap year to pursue new experiences, goals, and worlds before or during college is more (...)