12 Books About Travel You Have to Read

By: Allison Herman | January 3, 2018
Topics: Wanderlust
Whether you're looking for a mental escape or hoping to get inspiration for your next vacation, these non-fiction travelogues and memoirs will take you on an unforgettable journey.

You may already be familiar with some of the classic travel stories. Eat, Pray, Love; The Alchemist; On the Road; Into the Wild are just a few (and if you haven’t read them, you should). But if you’re on the hunt for more pages to turn, here are a few books to get your mind – then hopefully, your body – wandering.

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

Bryson was born in America, and upon returning after 20 years in England, decided to walk the Appalachian trail. The 2,100 mile trail is no easy feat, stretching all the way from Georgia to Maine! Bryson’s style is both witty and aware; he manages to find awe in even the most mundane sights. A Walk in the Woods is not only an intriguing read, but a much-needed reminder that sometimes, it is about how you get there. The journey itself can be the adventure.

 

 

In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson

Following the success of A Walk in the Woods, Bryson took his travels to the opposite side of the world: Australia. Bryson explores the history of the continent, interacts with its unique species and people, and poking fun at just a few of the town names. Bryson is adamant that Australia is the most dangerous place in the world, but it’s obvious he loves it immensely. By the end of this book, you will too, whether you’ve been there or not.

 

 

The Geography of Bliss by Eric Weiner

Weiner sets out to answer a philosophical question in this travel memoir. A self-proclaimed grump, Weiner wants to know where the happiest people in the world live. He travels to dozens of countries, each which have their fair share of problems. While he may deem one country the “happiest”, Weiner’s book reminds us that nowhere is perfect, and happiness is subjective.

 

 

 

The Places in Between by Roy Stewart

Not only did Roy Stewart decide to visit a place not many of us are familiar with, he decided to walk across the country of Afghanistan. In his book, Stewart recounts this two-year adventure, which took place in 2002 shortly after the Taliban were deposed. His writing is objective and clear, offering unprecedented insight to the country and its people. If you’re looking to learn more about an unexpected place, this is the book for you.

 

 

 

The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost by Rachel Friedman

Newly graduated, title good girl Rachel makes a life-changing decision when she buys a plane ticket to Ireland. While abroad for the first time, Rachel meets a friend with whom she travels to three different continents, learning to live in the moment. This coming-of-age story is filled with fun and personal anecdotes, as well as lessons about life after school. Anyone considering a gap year is sure to find answers in this book.

 

 

Love with a Chance of Drowning by Torre DeRoche

Like your adventure with a side of romance? In this story, DeRoche recounts an age-old story of meeting a man in a bar. However, this man is about to sail around the world, and he wants her to join. Despite a phobia of deep water, DeRoche throws caution to the wind and decides to go. This book is as much about self-discovery as it is about relationships, as DeRoche learns and sees more of the world around her. The combination of travel and love is tied together by DeRoche’s conversational writing style for a fun and easy read.

 

 

Paris Was Ours by Penelope Rowlands

 

This book consists of short stories from 32 different writers explaining what life in Paris is to them. Some moments are exciting and new, some depressing and mundane. Each one draws light to the dream of living in Paris, which often seems to be a love/hate relationship. Every city has its ups and downs, and this collection explores a variety of both for an in-depth, honest narrative.

 

 

Turn Right at Machu Picchu by Mark Adams

Adams had never done so much as sleep in a tent when he decided to journey through Machu Picchu. Adams is eager to uncover mysteries about the Incas and the fortress of Machu Picchu itself. His ability to describe the amazing sights he encounters both there and along the way is impressive and captivating. Not only is the book entertaining, readers really do discover Peru through Adams’ eyes. Adams’ tale serves as a note that anyone can begin to adventure at any time, and doing so will change your life.

 

 

Worldwalk by Steven Newman

At 28, Newman set off from his home in Ohio to backpack around the world. This four year journey took him across 21 countries on five continents. Newman’s background in journalism gave him the perfect platform to write about the unbelievable experiences he had and the unique individuals he met along the way. He may be an adult, but Newman’s journey is a compelling coming-of-age story sure to warm your heart and motivate your travels.

 

The Palace of the Snow Queen by Barbara Sjoholm

Sjoholm begins the recount of her travels in Sweden, and continues to travel throughout Scandinavia. She returns to the area for three winters, during which she learns about the area’s little known history and people. The far north may not be an area many choose to visit for vacation, but Sjoholm explores the tension between tourism and local Sami work and culture. The memoir is an intriguing and fascinating look into the famous Swedish Icehotel and the area surrounding it. Her tales won’t melt any ice, but they will fire up your desire to see this region of the north.

 

The Not-Quite States of America by Doug Mack

When you think of America, you probably think of the 50 states. But what about the other territories we occupy? Upon realizing how little he knew about these areas, Mack set off with a goal to learn more about them. From Puerto Rico and Guam, to the U.S. Virgin Islands, Polynesia, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands, Mack reminds us how crucial the territories are to the history of America. Both a fascinating, culture-rich memoir and a political, informative travelogue, this book should be read by every American.

 

 

The Caliph’s House: A Year in Casablanca by Tahir Shah

Motivated by childhood vacations in Morocco, Shah moves his family from London to Casablanca. The move into a run-down house is followed by the process of restoring its glory, with the help of three residents whose lives are run by the jinn. His account is both funny at times and deeply thoughtful at others. The cultural insight makes readers feel connected to the people despite geographic or spiritual difference, which is a hard feat to accomplish.

 

 

 

This is by no means an exhaustive list. Keep reading! Once you find an author you like, check to see if they have other works. Ask for recommendations. Peruse the travel section of your library or bookstore. And if you find any great reads that we should know about, be sure to let us know.

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